Reclaim our future: Oppose the corporate “development” agenda.

Una traducción al español por traductor Google seguirá a continuación.(https://translate.google.com.ph/#en/es/A%20Spanish%20translation%20by%20GOOGLE%20Translate%20will%20follow%20below.%20())

Dear all,

In September of this year, Heads of States and Governments will gather at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York City to agree on a new set of “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs) and a “global plan of action for people, planet and prosperity”.  The latest draft of this declaration which promises to “transform our world” by 2030 and ensure that “no one will be left behind” in the process has just been released today.

However, many of these same governments, particularly the more powerful ones among them, are also currently negotiating new “free trade” deals that will have far-reaching implications for peoples in both the global North and South and for the future of the world economy and the planet.  Indeed, the top negotiators from 12 countries representing over 60% of the global economy are currently meeting in Hawaii, US desperately trying to conclude by the end of this week the transpacific partnership agreement (TPP), the largest “trade” agreement since the establishment of the WTO in 1994.

These agreements as they are currently framed and when adopted side-by-side, will not usher a new dawn for humanity.  Instead they are likely to further concentrate power and wealth in the hands of the 1% on the one hand, and deepen the dispossession, exploitation and oppression of peoples and environmental plunder on the other.

We need to let these governments know that we will not accept a “development” agenda that will serve as a vehicle for strengthening corporate power, re-legitimize the global capitalist growth model and perpetuate neoliberal globalization.

Please send organizational endorsements to the attached statement, with country, to April at secretariat@peoplesgoals.orgby Friday, August 7th.

 

Reclaim our future.  Oppose the corporate “development” agenda

July 27, 2015

In the face of overwhelming evidence of persistent poverty, deepening inequality, ecological destruction, unprecedented loss of biodiversity and climate change accelerating under neoliberal capitalist development, governments have set 2015 as the year when they chart a new course for humanity – a path toward “sustainable development” that “leaves no one behind” and protects the planet.

In September of this year, Heads of States and Governments will gather at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York City to agree on a new set of “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs) and a “global plan of action for people, planet and prosperity”.  This new “Post-2015 development agenda” succeeds the Millennium Development Goals, which are supposed to have been achieved by 2015.  This new agenda promises to “transform our world” by 2030.However, many of these same governments, particularly the more powerful ones among them, are also currently negotiating new “free trade” deals across regions such as the Transpacific Partnership Agreement, Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, Trade-in-Services-Agreement and Economic Partnership Agreements, among many others that will have far-reaching implications for peoples in both the global North and South and for the future of the world economy. Like the World Trade Organization, these new trade agreements promise prosperity for all as a result of greater trade and investments across borders.  And yet all indications suggest that these agreements as they are currently framed and when adopted side-by-side, will not usher a new dawn for humanity.  Instead they are likely to further concentrate power and wealth in the hands of the 1% on the one hand, and deepen the dispossession, exploitation and oppression of peoples and environmental plunder on the other.

The emerging elite consensus on “development” for the post-2015 era aims for more business than usual.  Not only does it hold up the private sector as the driver of growth and innovation, it promotes private finance as the fuel of development. Governments are aggressively promoting Public Private Partnerships which shift the risks associated with large investments to the public while ensuring huge profits for large corporate investors through various forms of government guarantees and subsidies. Infrastructure development alone—in energy, transport, water and sanitation, agriculture, ICT, and so on—offer up to $1 trillion worth of investment opportunities per year. Allowing and encouraging private finance to “invest” in development projects such as large infrastructure projects or social services bundled up as new “asset classes” would also intensify pressures for “cost-recovery” and greater commercialization, if not downright privatization of public services.  More projects likely would be directed at profitable sectors and facilitating the global production and trading of multinational corporations (MNCs) instead of prioritizing the needs of impoverished and marginalized sectors.  We can expect a more aggressive implementation of mega-infrastructure projects that are often associated with landgrabbing, gentrification, forced evictions, massive displacements and other human rights violations affecting indigenous peoples, campesinos, rural and urban communities, especially but not only in the global South.

Yet, by claiming to contribute to the achievement of “sustainable development goals,” large corporations seek to enhance their public image even as many of them continue to violate workers’ rights, the environment and the public interest with impunity.

Indeed, the so-called 21st century trade agreements, secretly being negotiated by governments worldwide, would erect a global legal framework that strengthens corporate rights over people’s rights and the environment.  Not only do they strengthen MNC’s control over production and trade of goods and services within and across borders, they also hamper governments from regulating the operations of MNCs, and prevent underdeveloped countries from actively promoting industrialization and sustainable development.  Indeed they would empower MNCs to sue governments for implementing policies that would potentially harm investors’ “rights” to profit even when they are intended to promote the public interest.  This would belie governments’ commitment to the realization of human rights and the attainment of the new SDGs.  If these agreements shape the policy agenda for sustainable development for the coming decades, then we can expect a new wave of privatization and financialisation with even more dire consequences than the old Washington consensus.

Therefore, we demand that governments:

  1. Uphold the primacy of human rights. States must acknowledge that they bear the primary responsibility to ensure that both their agents and other nonstate actors—whether corporations or multilateral institutions—adhere to human rights norms and standards in their conduct affecting people and communities. The new development agenda must be clear and explicit about, and faithfully monitor states’ extraterritorial human rights obligations, especially in the field of economic, social and cultural rights, as well as the right to development. International agreements that exact obligations that run contrary to states’ duty to respect, protect, and fulfill human rights must be declared illegitimate, immoral and therefore invalid. No international agreement should be negotiated in secret and without public participation or support.  Indeed there should be strong support and enabling environment for the participation of people and their organizations in decisions that affect their lives and future generations.
  1. Tackle inequality and the overconcentration of wealth. Governments must implement redistributive measures to address inequality, going beyond the rhetoric of leaving no one behind. Governments must commit to clear targets for achieving more equality in the distribution of incomes and ownership of productive resources including land, finance, technology, services, and industries. Governments should commit to promoting and scaling up solidarity-based, traditional, collective and public forms of ownership, especially for women and other marginalized groups in society. The international community should cancel all illegitimate debts of countries, remedy unfair trade and taxation regimes that rob poorer countries of trillions of dollars a year, and stop the unsustainable extraction of resources from underdeveloped countries.
  1. Rein in corporate power. Governments should adopt a strong independent regulatory framework for business and the financial sector to ensure that they respect human rights and are held accountable when they do not. Rather than rely on corporate self-regulation and voluntarism, governments must enforce right-to-know provisions and mandatory public disclosure for multinational corporations; require independent accounting of their production and commercial operations as well as independent technology assessments; require participatory human rights impact assessments; free prior and informed consent for indigenous peoples; establish mechanisms for redress; and penalties for corporate infractions and violations of human rights and nature.
  1. Address the climate crisis. Governments should commit to limit global temperature rise to 1.5C through drastic emission cuts and fair-sharing of the global carbon budget that takes into account per capita historical emissions, without resorting to carbon trading or offsets. This must be accompanied by clear commitments on the delivery of adequate and appropriate climate finance and technology for mitigation actions in the South. The burden of this transition must be borne by the advanced industrialized countries, the biggest corporations and the wealthiest classes globally and within each country who have exploited people and the planet the most.Without these minimum transformative reforms, the development agenda for the post-2015 era will not make a dent on the structural conditions that breed poverty, inequality, environmental degradation, violence and multiple crises. Even worse, it may serve as a veil for further strengthening corporate power and reinforcing neocolonial relations between rich and poor countries.

Therefore we are ever ready to mobilize, to hold our governments to account, to stimulate public debate and engagement, and promote development justice for all.  Above all, we affirm our commitment to fight poverty, inequality and injustice by bringing an end to all structures of exploitation and oppression, by asserting our inalienable right not simply to live but to live with dignity, solidarity and care for people and nature.

Signed

Campaign for Peoples Goals for Sustainable Development

AID/WATCH, Australia

Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants (APMM)

Andra Pradesh Vyavasaya Vruthidarula Union (APVVU), India

Asia Pacific Women, Law and Development (APWLD)

Asian Peasant Coalition (APC)

Africaine de Recherche et de Cooperation pour l’Appui au Developpement Endogene

(ARCADE), Senegal

Asociation Qachuu Aloom, (Madre Tierra) Rabinal, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala

Asociation Raxch’ och’ Oxlaju Aj (Tierra Verde 13 Aj) (AROAJ), Guatemala

Center for Research and Advocacy, Manipur

Collectif des ONG pour la Sécurité Alimentaire et le Développement rural (COSADER),

Cameroon

Global People Surge

Habitat International Coalition (HIC)

Grupo de Trabajo de Cambio Climático y Justicia (GTCCJ-Bolivia)

IBON International

Indigenous Peoples Movement for Self Determination and Liberation (IPMSDL)

Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Nigeria

National Fisheries Solidarity Movement, Sri Lanka

Social Development Integrated Centre (Social Action), Kenya

Social Development Network (SODNET), Kenya

Ogoni Solidarity Forum (OSF), Nigeria

Roots for Equity, Pakistan

(Traducción española por: https://translate.google.com.ph/#en/es/Spanish%20Translation%20by%3A )

Queridos todos,

En septiembre de este año, los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno se reunirán en la sede de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) en Nueva York a un acuerdo sobre un nuevo conjunto de “Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible” (ODS) y un “plan de acción mundial para la gente, planeta y la prosperidad “. El último borrador de esta declaración que promete “transformar nuestro mundo” en 2030 y garantizar que “nadie se quedará atrás” en el proceso acaba de ser publicado hoy.

Sin embargo, muchos de estos mismos gobiernos, en particular los más poderosos entre ellos, también están actualmente negociando nuevos acuerdos de “libre comercio” que tendrá implicaciones de largo alcance para los pueblos tanto en el Norte y el Sur y para el futuro de la economía mundial y el planeta. De hecho, los principales negociadores de 12 países que representan más del 60% de la economía mundial están actualmente reunidos en Hawai, Estados Unidos tratando desesperadamente de concluir a finales de esta semana el acuerdo de asociación transpacífico (TPP), el mayor acuerdo “comercial” desde el establecimiento de la OMC en 1994.

Estos acuerdos, ya que actualmente están enmarcadas y cuando sea adoptada de lado a lado, no marcará el comienzo de un nuevo amanecer para la humanidad. En cambio, es probable que concentrar aún más el poder y la riqueza en manos de la 1%, por un lado, y profundizar el despojo, la explotación y la opresión de los pueblos y el saqueo del medio ambiente por el otro.

Tenemos que dejar que estos gobiernos saben que no vamos a aceptar una agenda de “desarrollo” que servirá como vehículo para reforzar el poder empresarial, re-legitimar el modelo global de crecimiento capitalista y perpetuar la globalización neoliberal.

Por favor envíe endosos de organización para la declaración adjunta, con el país, a April at secretariat@peoplesgoals.orgby Friday, August 7th. 

Reclamar nuestro futuro. Oponerse a la agenda corporativa “desarrollo”

27 de Julio 2015

Ante la abrumadora evidencia de la pobreza persistente, la profundización de la desigualdad, la destrucción del medio ambiente, la pérdida sin precedentes de biodiversidad y el cambio climático acelera en fase de desarrollo capitalista neoliberal, los gobiernos han fijado 2015 como el año en que trazar un nuevo rumbo para la humanidad – un camino hacia “sostenible desarrollo “que” no deja a nadie atrás “y protege el planeta.

En septiembre de este año, los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno se reunirán en la sede de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) en Nueva York a un acuerdo sobre un nuevo conjunto de “Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible” (ODS) y un “plan de acción mundial para la gente, planeta y la prosperidad “. Esta nueva “agenda de desarrollo post-2015” tiene éxito los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio, que se supone que se han alcanzado en 2015. Este nuevo programa promete “transformar nuestro mundo” en 2030.

Sin embargo, muchos de estos mismos gobiernos, en particular los más poderosos entre ellos, también están actualmente negociando nuevos acuerdos de “libre comercio” entre las regiones, como el Acuerdo Transpacífico de Asociación, Transatlantic Comercio y Sociedad de Inversiones, Comercio-en-Servicios-Acuerdo y Económica Acuerdos de Asociación, entre muchos otros que tendrán consecuencias para los pueblos tanto en el Norte y el Sur y para el futuro de la economía mundial de largo alcance. Al igual que la Organización Mundial del Comercio, estos nuevos acuerdos comerciales prometen prosperidad para todos, como resultado de un mayor comercio e inversiones a través de las fronteras.

Y sin embargo, todos los indicios sugieren que estos acuerdos como actualmente están enmarcadas y cuando sea adoptada de lado a lado, no marcará el comienzo de un nuevo amanecer para la humanidad. En cambio, es probable que concentrar aún más el poder y la

riqueza en manos de la 1%, por un lado, y profundizar el despojo, la explotación y la opresión de los pueblos y el saqueo del medio ambiente por el otro.El consenso de la élite emergente en el “desarrollo” para la era post-2015 apunta a más negocios de lo habitual. No sólo se sostiene el sector privado como motor del crecimiento y la innovación, promueve la financiación privada como el combustible del desarrollo.Los gobiernos están promoviendo agresivamente asociaciones público-privadas que cambian los riesgos asociados con grandes inversiones para el público al tiempo que garantiza grandes ganancias para los grandes inversores corporativos a través de diversas formas de garantías y subsidios del gobierno. El desarrollo de infraestructura por sí sola en la energía, el transporte, el agua y el saneamiento, la agricultura, las TIC, y así sucesivamente-oferta hasta $ 1 billón de oportunidades de inversión por año.

Permitir y la financiación privada alentador “invertir” en los proyectos de desarrollo, tales como grandes proyectos de infraestructura o servicios sociales agrupados como nuevas “clases de activos” también intensificaría las presiones de “recuperación de costos” y una mayor comercialización, si no francamente privatización de los servicios públicos. Más proyectos que se dirigen a sectores rentables y facilitar la producción mundial y el comercio de las empresas multinacionales (EMN) en lugar de dar prioridad a las necesidades de los sectores pobres y marginados. Podemos esperar una aplicación más agresiva de mega-proyectos de infraestructura que se asocian a menudo con el acaparamiento de tierras, la gentrificación, desalojos forzosos, desplazamientos masivos y otras violaciónes de derechos humanos que afectan a los pueblos indígenas, campesinos, comunidades rurales y urbanas, especialmente pero no sólo en el Sur global .

Sin embargo, al reclamar para contribuir a la consecución de “objetivos de desarrollo sostenible,” las grandes corporaciones tratan de mejorar su imagen pública aun cuando muchos de ellos siguen violando los derechos de los trabajadores, el medio ambiente y el interés público con impunidad.

De hecho, los llamados acuerdos comerciales del siglo 21, en secreto siendo negociados por los gobiernos de todo el mundo, sería erigir un marco jurídico global que fortalece los derechos corporativos sobre los derechos de las personas y el medio ambiente. No sólo fortalecer el control de las multinacionales sobre la producción y el comercio de bienes y servicios dentro y fuera de las fronteras, sino que también obstaculizan los gobiernos de regular las operaciones de las empresas multinacionales, y evitan que los países subdesarrollados de la promoción activa de la industrialización y el desarrollo sostenible. De hecho ellos empoderar multinacionales para demandar a los gobiernos para implementar políticas que potencialmente dañar a los “derechos” de los inversores se beneficien incluso cuando están destinadas a promover el interés público. Esto desmentir el compromiso de los gobiernos para la realización de los derechos humanos y el logro de los nuevos ODS.

Si estos acuerdos dan forma a la agenda de políticas para el desarrollo sostenible para las próximas décadas, entonces podemos esperar una nueva ola de privatización y financiarización con consecuencias aún más graves que el viejo consenso de Washington.

Por lo tanto, exigimos que los gobiernos:

  1. Defender la primacía de los derechos humanos. Los Estados deben reconocer que ellos tienen la responsabilidad primordial de garantizar que tanto sus agentes y otros actores no estatales, ya sea empresas o instituciones multilaterales, se adhieren a las normas de derechos humanos y las normas de conducta en sus afecta a las personas y las comunidades. La nueva agenda de desarrollo debe ser clara y explícita sobre, y fielmente monitorear obligaciones de los Estados de

los derechos humanos extraterritoriales, especialmente en el campo de los derechos económicos, sociales y culturales, así como el derecho al desarrollo. Los acuerdos internacionales que exacta obligaciones que son contrarias al deber de los Estados de respetar, proteger y cumplir los derechos humanos deben ser declarados ilegítima, inmoral y, por tanto, no es válido. Ningún acuerdo internacional debe ser negociado en secreto y sin la participación del público o de apoyo. De hecho no debe haber un fuerte apoyo y entorno propicio para la participación de las personas y sus organizaciones en las decisiones que afectan sus vidas y las generaciones futuras.

  1. frente a la desigualdad y la excesiva concentración de la riqueza. Los gobiernos deben implementar medidas redistributivas para hacer frente a la desigualdad, más allá de la retórica de dejar a nadie atrás. Los gobiernos deben comprometerse a eliminar objetivos para el logro de una mayor igualdad en la distribución de los ingresos y la propiedad de los recursos productivos como la tierra, las finanzas, la tecnología, los servicios y las industrias. Los gobiernos deben comprometerse a promover y ampliar la solidaridad de base, las formas tradicionales, colectivos y públicos de la propiedad, especialmente para las mujeres y otros grupos marginados de la sociedad. La comunidad internacional debe cancelar todas las deudas ilegítimas de los países, remediar los regímenes comerciales y fiscales injustas que los países más pobres de robar miles de millones de dólares al año, y detener la extracción no sostenible de los recursos de los países subdesarrollados.
  1. Rein en el poder corporativo. Los gobiernos deberían adoptar un sólido marco regulador independiente para los negocios y el sector financiero para garantizar que se respeten los derechos humanos y tienen que rendir cuentas cuando no lo hacen. En lugar de confiar en la autorregulación y el voluntarismo empresarial, los gobiernos deben hacer cumplir las disposiciones de Derecho al conocimiento y divulgación pública obligatoria para las empresas multinacionales; requerir contabilidad independiente de sus operaciones de producción y comerciales, así como las evaluaciones independientes de tecnología; requieren evaluaciones de impacto de derechos humanos de participación; consentimiento previo, libre e informado de los pueblos indígenas; establecer mecanismos de reparación; y las sanciones por infracciones corporativas y violaciónes de los derechos humanos y la naturaleza.
  1. Abordar la crisis climática. Los gobiernos deben comprometerse a limitar el aumento de la temperatura global a través de la reducción de emisiones 1.5c drásticas y la distribución equitativa del presupuesto global de carbono que tiene en cuenta las emisiones históricas per cápita, sin recurrir al comercio de carbono o las compensaciones. Esto debe ir acompañado de compromisos claros sobre la entrega de financiamiento para el clima y la tecnología adecuada y apropiada para las acciones de mitigación en el Sur. La carga de esta transición debe ser asumido por los países avanzados industrializados, las corporaciones más grandes y las clases más ricas a nivel mundial y dentro de cada país que tienen los explotados y el planeta más. Sin estas reformas mínimas de transformación, el programa de desarrollo para la era post-2015 no hará mella en las condiciones estructurales que reproducen la pobreza, la desigualdad, la degradación del medio ambiente, la violencia y las múltiples crisis. Lo que es peor, puede servir como un velo para fortalecer aún más el poder empresarial y reforzar las relaciones neocoloniales entre países ricos y pobres.Por lo tanto estamos siempre dispuestos a movilizarse, a nuestros gobiernos a rendir cuentas, para estimular el debate público y la participación, y promover la justicia desarrollo para todos. Por encima de todo, afirmamos nuestro compromiso de luchar contra la pobreza, la desigualdad y la injusticia por poner fin a todas las estructuras de explotación y opresión, al afirmar nuestro derecho inalienable no sólo para vivir sino para vivir con dignidad, la solidaridad y la atención a las personas y la naturaleza.

Firmado:

Campaign for Peoples Goals for Sustainable Development

AID/WATCH, Australia

Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants (APMM)

Andra Pradesh Vyavasaya Vruthidarula Union (APVVU), India

Asia Pacific Women, Law and Development (APWLD)

Asian Peasant Coalition (APC)

Africaine de Recherche et de Cooperation pour l’Appui au Developpement Endogene

(ARCADE), Senegal

Asociation Qachuu Aloom, (Madre Tierra) Rabinal, Baja Verapaz, Guatemala

Asociation Raxch’ och’ Oxlaju Aj (Tierra Verde 13 Aj) (AROAJ), Guatemala

Center for Research and Advocacy, Manipur

Collectif des ONG pour la Sécurité Alimentaire et le Développement rural (COSADER),

Cameroon

Global People Surge

Habitat International Coalition (HIC)

Grupo de Trabajo de Cambio Climático y Justicia (GTCCJ-Bolivia)

IBON International

Indigenous Peoples Movement for Self Determination and Liberation (IPMSDL)

Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Nigeria

National Fisheries Solidarity Movement, Sri Lanka

Social Development Integrated Centre (Social Action), Kenya

Social Development Network (SODNET), Kenya

Ogoni Solidarity Forum (OSF), Nigeria

Roots for Equity, Pakistan