Joint Intervention of CISA and Yamasi People in the 15th session of the UNPFII

*Spanish Translation follows by Google Translate/Traducción Español seguido por Google Translate

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

15th Session – Theme: “Indigenous peoples: conflict, peace and resolution

New York, 9 – 20 May 2016.

 

Mr. Chairman,

Members of the Permanent Forum,

Indigenous Brothers and Sisters, may the Great Spirit guide us in this session.

Free, prior and informed consent is indispensable for world peace and security.

 

Therefore, in the name of the Consultancy of Indigenous Peoples in the North of Mexico, the International Community of Andean Wisdom (CISA) of Ecuador and the Yamasi People (USA), we respectfully present the following recommendations to the Permanent Forum:

 

  1. That the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues urge UN Member States in general and Mexico in particular to set out urgent actions and establish legal mechanisms for the implementation of their Constitutions on the right to prior consultation and the obtaining of the free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples, according to ILO Convention 169 of the International Labour Organization on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

With reference to the Mexican State, we ask: As a signatory to ILO Convention 169, to what extent has the Mexican State ethically fulfilled its commitments with reference to the prior consultation with Indigenous Peoples in all matters that concern them, such as legislative, political, administrative and development matters? To date, the mechanism used, the advisory services of the National Commission for Indigenous Peoples’ Development, has been inefficient, with inappropriate measures to achieve the aim of prior consultation. Good faith is lacking and the measures only serve to manipulate Indigenous Peoples, by working with particular groups in the communities who accept all of their demands.

 

  1. That the Permanent Forum request that Member States provide specific reports on the legal framework and procedures that exist for the granting of permits and concessions to national and international companies when they wish to develop projects on indigenous territories.

 

There are thousands of Indigenous Peoples who survive under an institutional colonial control that is aided by criminal transnational organizations (CTOs) through the colonial institutions of rape, prostitution, imprisonment and slavery, and under the protection of colonial laws. Therefore, we request that the Permanent Forum work together with the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in order to analyse the legal and economic aspects of the colonial institutions of rape, prostitution, imprisonment and slavery, their impact and possible solutions. EMRIP should report on the opportunities for implementing financial monitoring of Transnational Crime activities by Indigenous Peoples proscribed in UNTOC, which will reduce human rights abuses of Indigenous Peoples and neighbors.

 

  1. Our organizations are speaking out to request that this UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues urge the Mexican State to explain the disappearance of the 43 youths in Ayotzinapa, since it is a crime against Mexico and the world. Those youths are also our youths; those sons are also our sons.

 

Mr. Chairman:

When we speak of indigenous issues, we touch upon magic, beliefs, imagination, vision and the legitimate rights of original populations, the most ancient residents of the world, whose historical memory is found in each inhabitant of this planet, if we know it or not.

 

The patriarch and traditional singer, Don Juan Albañez Higuera (may he rest in peace), of the Pai Pai native indigenous community of the Santa Catarina Mission, in the Municipality of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, spoke about the relationship with the earth, the air, the clouds, water, and the sacred hills, dressed like women in white, which gave their people water, honey, deer, pine nuts and acorns, and to whom they gave thanks with their songs and ancestral dances.

 

We understand by this that indigenous territory has a spiritual conception with a sacred significance, that Indigenous Peoples see their territory as something essential to their existence and for which they consider they have been the guardians from time immemorial. Land, territory and Indigenous Peoples – the perfect ancestral trinomial – past, present and future seen through a special optical lens, difficult to understand for those who see these lands as goods, with a commercial and economic value. The habitat of these peoples is rich in natural resources and therefore attracts the attention of private interests and governments, who often receive the support of international agencies such as the World Bank or the Inter-American Development Bank, who are conscious of the acts and consequences that will harm Indigenous Peoples.

 

It is possible to cite many examples of destruction and the eviction of Indigenous Peoples and communities from their lands across the length and breadth of all continents, from Asia to America, including in the Sierra Tarahumara in the State of Chihuahua or in the native communities of Pai Pai, Cucapá, Kumiai, Kiliwa and Cochimí in the State of Baja California, Mexico.

 

Their demands stem from the decision to defend their natural resources, which constitute their livelihoods and their future as peoples; but this does not suffice for transnational companies to desist from their idea of taking control of these resources in order to convert them into goods that can be traded, with the support of national governments, who provide them with the necessary facilities.

 

On behalf of the Yamasi People, in North America we state:

 

UN Member States unilaterally decide to designate ‘sacrifice’ areas – areas to defoliate or poison with toxic substances for the good of “security”. The military solution is often the least productive response to tension or conflict. Indigenous Peoples propose solutions that allow opportunities for opposing sides to achieve their goals in good measure.  We propose a sharing approach, not an all-or-nothing approach.  Yamasi People, neighboring Indigenous Peoples, and our increasing number of colonial neighbors suffer from perpetual poisoning from nuclear radiation in the area of the Savannah River site, the largest nuclear weapons processing facility in the world.

 

The US has decreased security in the area of Savannah River site (SRS) by forcibly imposing on Indigenous and non-indigenous Peoples unwanted and unnecessary US-subsidized nuclear reactors in this same ‘sacrifice’ area. The US has decreased security in the area of SRS by soliciting nuclear waste from all over the world to traffick to original nations with SRS, with whom the US has no agreement for such activities.  World security is threatened by this concentration of nuclear material in a US-occupied area where the US continues to promote violence and refuses to negotiate peace with Indigenous Peoples.

 

Further, Yamasi People in particular are violently targeted by US-paid unsustainable developers. Yamasi are assaulted, raped, incarcerated, torture, trafficked, enslaved, and murdered by the US because we offer a more productive approach to peace and security planning. Because Yamasi People do not consent to the US unsustainable development agenda of building money-laundering facilities for transnational crime organizations, the US gives US federal tax money to the entities that the US has created to appropriate our identity. The US violates the reproductive rights of Yamasi women and girls instead of facilitating education and leadership development. Instead of negotiating with Yamasi leaders, the US generation after generation consciously and deliberately rapes Yamasi leaders.  This violence could end if the UN sanctioned Members practicing discrimination under the color of apartheid law, as the US does with US ‘Indian Law’.

 

Colonial authorities apply apartheid laws to authorize criminal transnational organizations to appropriate our indigenous identity for development purposes. When Indigenous Peoples oppose unsustainable development, the colonials—without the free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples—create shell companies that are often criminal transnational organizations posing as Indigenous Peoples in order to assign them rights to the development of Indigenous Peoples. The international community has for too many generations supported these activities, with the explicit support of the progenitors of the European Union and its system of slavery based on the appropriation of the rights to development of Indigenous Peoples.

 

This system of granting the development rights of Indigenous Peoples to shell corporations that are criminal transnational organizations (TCOs) threatens world security because this type of development that lacks free, prior and informed consent has consequences such as conflict and climate change.

 

Free prior and informed consent is essential for world peace and security.

 

 

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

 

·         Consultoría de los Pueblos Indígenas en el norte de México, A.C. (CPINM)  MEXICO
[Consultancy of Indigenous Peoples in the North of Mexico]

EDIFICIO TORRE ESTRELLA, Calle Luis Cabrera # 2071 – Despacho 206

Zona Urbana Río, Tijuana, Baja California, México. C.P. 22010

Tel. +52 (664) 6340371 Cel. +52 (664) 1968079

consultoria_indigena@yahoo.com.mx

 

  • Comunidad del Saber Andino (CISA) ECUADOR
    [Community of Andean Wisdom]

Almendros s/n planta alta

Quito, Ecuador.

Tel. + (593) 999298117

manpujarksisa@gmail.com

 

  • Yamasi People

Box 60033 Savannah MGeorgia a 31420  North America

Ph. + (912) 376 9786

international@yamasi.org

********************

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

15th Session – Theme: “Indigenous peoples: conflict, peace and resolution

New York, 9 – 20 May 2016.

 

 

Mr. Chairman,

Members of the Permanent Forum,

Indigenous Brothers and Sisters, may the Great Spirit guide us in this session.

 

Free, prior and informed consent is indispensable for world peace and security.

 

Therefore, in the name of the Consultancy of Indigenous Peoples in the North of Mexico, the International Community of Andean Wisdom (CISA) of Ecuador and the Yamasi People (USA), we respectfully present the following recommendations to the Permanent Forum:

 

  1. That the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues urge UN Member States in general and Mexico in particular to set out urgent actions and establish legal mechanisms for the implementation of their Constitutions on the right to prior consultation and the obtaining of the free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples, according to ILO Convention 169 of the International Labour Organization on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Independent Countries and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

With reference to the Mexican State, we ask: As a signatory to ILO Convention 169, to what extent has the Mexican State ethically fulfilled its commitments with reference to the prior consultation with Indigenous Peoples in all matters that concern them, such as legislative, political, administrative and development matters? To date, the mechanism used, the advisory services of the National Commission for Indigenous Peoples’ Development, has been inefficient, with inappropriate measures to achieve the aim of prior consultation. Good faith is lacking and the measures only serve to manipulate Indigenous Peoples, by working with particular groups in the communities who accept all of their demands.

 

  1. That the Permanent Forum request that Member States provide specific reports on the legal framework and procedures that exist for the granting of permits and concessions to national and international companies when they wish to develop projects on indigenous territories.

 

There are thousands of Indigenous Peoples who survive under an institutional colonial control that is aided by criminal transnational organizations (CTOs) through the colonial institutions of rape, prostitution, imprisonment and slavery, and under the protection of colonial laws. Therefore, we request that the Permanent Forum work together with the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in order to analyse the legal and economic aspects of the colonial institutions of rape, prostitution, imprisonment and slavery, their impact and possible solutions. EMRIP should report on the opportunities for implementing financial monitoring of Transnational Crime activities by Indigenous Peoples proscribed in UNTOC, which will reduce human rights abuses of Indigenous Peoples and neighbors.

 

  1. Our organizations are speaking out to request that this UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues urge the Mexican State to explain the disappearance of the 43 youths in Ayotzinapa, since it is a crime against Mexico and the world. Those youths are also our youths; those sons are also our sons.

 

Mr. Chairman:

When we speak of indigenous issues, we touch upon magic, beliefs, imagination, vision and the legitimate rights of original populations, the most ancient residents of the world, whose historical memory is found in each inhabitant of this planet, if we know it or not.

 

The patriarch and traditional singer, Don Juan Albañez Higuera (may he rest in peace), of the Pai Pai native indigenous community of the Santa Catarina Mission, in the Municipality of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, spoke about the relationship with the earth, the air, the clouds, water, and the sacred hills, dressed like women in white, which gave their people water, honey, deer, pine nuts and acorns, and to whom they gave thanks with their songs and ancestral dances.

 

We understand by this that indigenous territory has a spiritual conception with a sacred significance, that Indigenous Peoples see their territory as something essential to their existence and for which they consider they have been the guardians from time immemorial. Land, territory and Indigenous Peoples – the perfect ancestral trinomial – past, present and future seen through a special optical lens, difficult to understand for those who see these lands as goods, with a commercial and economic value. The habitat of these peoples is rich in natural resources and therefore attracts the attention of private interests and governments, who often receive the support of international agencies such as the World Bank or the Inter-American Development Bank, who are conscious of the acts and consequences that will harm Indigenous Peoples.

 

It is possible to cite many examples of destruction and the eviction of Indigenous Peoples and communities from their lands across the length and breadth of all continents, from Asia to America, including in the Sierra Tarahumara in the State of Chihuahua or in the native communities of Pai Pai, Cucapá, Kumiai, Kiliwa and Cochimí in the State of Baja California, Mexico.

 

Their demands stem from the decision to defend their natural resources, which constitute their livelihoods and their future as peoples; but this does not suffice for transnational companies to desist from their idea of taking control of these resources in order to convert them into goods that can be traded, with the support of national governments, who provide them with the necessary facilities.

 

On behalf of the Yamasi People, in North America we state:

 

UN Member States unilaterally decide to designate ‘sacrifice’ areas – areas to defoliate or poison with toxic substances for the good of “security”. The military solution is often the least productive response to tension or conflict. Indigenous Peoples propose solutions that allow opportunities for opposing sides to achieve their goals in good measure.  We propose a sharing approach, not an all-or-nothing approach.  Yamasi People, neighboring Indigenous Peoples, and our increasing number of colonial neighbors suffer from perpetual poisoning from nuclear radiation in the area of the Savannah River site, the largest nuclear weapons processing facility in the world.

 

The US has decreased security in the area of Savannah River site (SRS) by forcibly imposing on Indigenous and non-indigenous Peoples unwanted and unnecessary US-subsidized nuclear reactors in this same ‘sacrifice’ area. The US has decreased security in the area of SRS by soliciting nuclear waste from all over the world to traffick to original nations with SRS, with whom the US has no agreement for such activities.  World security is threatened by this concentration of nuclear material in a US-occupied area where the US continues to promote violence and refuses to negotiate peace with Indigenous Peoples.

 

Further, Yamasi People in particular are violently targeted by US-paid unsustainable developers. Yamasi are assaulted, raped, incarcerated, torture, trafficked, enslaved, and murdered by the US because we offer a more productive approach to peace and security planning. Because Yamasi People do not consent to the US unsustainable development agenda of building money-laundering facilities for transnational crime organizations, the US gives US federal tax money to the entities that the US has created to appropriate our identity. The US violates the reproductive rights of Yamasi women and girls instead of facilitating education and leadership development. Instead of negotiating with Yamasi leaders, the US generation after generation consciously and deliberately rapes Yamasi leaders.  This violence could end if the UN sanctioned Members practicing discrimination under the color of apartheid law, as the US does with US ‘Indian Law’.

 

Colonial authorities apply apartheid laws to authorize criminal transnational organizations to appropriate our indigenous identity for development purposes. When Indigenous Peoples oppose unsustainable development, the colonials—without the free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples—create shell companies that are often criminal transnational organizations posing as Indigenous Peoples in order to assign them rights to the development of Indigenous Peoples. The international community has for too many generations supported these activities, with the explicit support of the progenitors of the European Union and its system of slavery based on the appropriation of the rights to development of Indigenous Peoples.

 

This system of granting the development rights of Indigenous Peoples to shell corporations that are criminal transnational organizations (TCOs) threatens world security because this type of development that lacks free, prior and informed consent has consequences such as conflict and climate change.

 

Free prior and informed consent is essential for world peace and security.

 

 

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

 

·         Consultoría de los Pueblos Indígenas en el norte de México, A.C. (CPINM)  MEXICO
[Consultancy of Indigenous Peoples in the North of Mexico]

EDIFICIO TORRE ESTRELLA, Calle Luis Cabrera # 2071 – Despacho 206

Zona Urbana Río, Tijuana, Baja California, México. C.P. 22010

Tel. +52 (664) 6340371 Cel. +52 (664) 1968079

consultoria_indigena@yahoo.com.mx

 

  • Comunidad del Saber Andino (CISA) ECUADOR
    [Community of Andean Wisdom]

Almendros s/n planta alta

Quito, Ecuador.

Tel. + (593) 999298117

manpujarksisa@gmail.com

 

  • Yamasi People

Box 60033 Savannah MGeorgia a 31420  North America

Ph. + (912) 376 9786

international@yamasi.org